Minden Press-Herald

Wednesday
Oct 01st

Flood closes part of MMC

GeorgeFrench150-midMinden Medical Center surgeons are able to perform operations at the local hospital, despite a housekeeping accident that caused flooding in MMC's three operating rooms.

MMC CEO George E. French III said while cleaning OR-1 about two weeks ago, a staff member "inadvertently hit a sprinkler head, causing the sprinkler system to engage and completely inundate that area with water."

French said there was also damage to the common wall and the flooring in OR-3.

"OR-2 was relatively unscathed but out of an abundance of caution, we also closed that off," French said.

LifePoint Hospitals, which owns MMC, has a company on contract that handles water damage and remediation.

"They came from Fort Worth and we had an environmental company out of Shreveport, that tested and checked out OR-2," French said. "It got a clean bill of health and approval to open it up for use on July 23."

French said it could be August 10 before OR-1 is functional again; however, OR-3 should be useable before then. He said it will be like having two new operating rooms for the patients.

"In OR-1, we had to tear out and replace the ceiling, sheetrock and floor," he said. "The common wall in OR-3, we had to take that out, too, and we're replacing and upgrading those floors."
The hospital is currently running two surgical shifts in OR-2 as needed.

"Normally, we work 7 (a.m.) to 3 (p.m.), but now we are also running 3 to 11 (p.m.), if need be," French said.

MMC averages 200 surgeries per month. He said they are able to perform half to two-thirds that number right now.

During the time immediately following the accident, French said, only one patient was sent to Springhill Medical Center, while two orthopedic patients were sent to Highland Hospital where they underwent surgery using the same physician they would have used at MMC.

"The day after it happened, we had 17 surgeries scheduled," French said. "We were able to reschedule all but those three. We are seeing everybody we can see. The doctors have been good about assessing and rescheduling. If it's a life-threatening surgery, we are able to get it in."

 

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